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Unread 01-29-2013, 08:27 PM   #1
SlasherQueen
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Question Sewing my cosplay

um Hi. This may seem a weird question but my old sewing machine broke(it was my great-grandmothers, R.I.P. old girl) and I wont be getting a new one until probably next year so my question is, is it possible to sewing cosplay without a machine and using just and old needle and thread and have it not end up looking all wonky and weird?
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Unread 01-29-2013, 09:09 PM   #2
Akahime
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I hear people do it and I seen a couple who has hand sewn their cosplays and looked amazing (though that was a long time ago and I'm not even sure where I saw that anymore). But the only negative thing about hand sewing your cosplay is that it takes A LOT of time. When I first hand sewed my little sister's Hanabi from Naruto cosplay shirt (just the shirt!!!), it took me 1+ hour just to finish it without haven't to make it look .. well like you said "wonky and weird". Hahaha.

But if you have patience, I think it's definitely possible. :3 Good luck!
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Unread 01-30-2013, 08:23 AM   #3
Leslie2004
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As Akahime already said, to do hand sewing right just takes time, but have you tried getting your machine repaired? If it's nothing major, it may just be a $50 repair. That's what my last servicing cost. Just because it's old doesn't mean it can't be fixed. I have a Singer Featherweight from the 1950s and it works better then most modern machines.
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Unread 01-30-2013, 10:49 AM   #4
Syagria
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Yeah, usually, those old machines can take a beating and keep on chugging along - they're all metal, as opposed to modern machines which are lighter, but made of weaker plastic.

Yes, you could hand-sew the cosplay- just be sure you can reasonably sew a good backstitch with small even stitches!
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Unread 01-31-2013, 09:09 AM   #5
Penlowe
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I third getting the machine to a repair shop.
Remember, everything was made by hand until the invention of the home sewing machine in the 1830's. You can do it, all you need is time.
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Unread 01-31-2013, 10:06 AM   #6
MedievalGirl
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+1 for seeing if you can get the machine repaired. Your local fabric shop may have a machine repair service. Those older machines are worth it especially for all the odd things costumers end up sewing.

That said handsewing can be fun. I do historical renactments and even if I sew the long seams on a machine I finish it by hand. Once when I was bed ridden after a surgery I sewed an entire men's 14th century ensemble by hand. It took about 8 solid days. (There were a lot of button holes. Oh lordy, the button holes.) The important thing about hand sewing is to use the right stitch. A load bearing seam needs small stitches that double back. There are specific ways to do a hem or to add trim that are worth looking up.
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Unread 02-02-2013, 03:08 PM   #7
SlasherQueen
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Thanks for replying everyone and I wish I could get it fix but my great grandmother brought that thing over on the boat. I think my grandmother said it was from the early 1900's(i think 1902) and the cord on it is cloth that's the part that's broken, well not broken exactly cuz it still turns on and stuff but the cloth is unraveling so I'm kinda afraid to use it. And in order to repair that it would cost the same as a brand new machine. So I think I'll start a new thread over in the machine section cuz I think it would be best if I just got the new machine.(birthdays coming up so I'll probably just hit up the family for money to buy a new one.)
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Unread 02-03-2013, 07:34 AM   #8
Penlowe
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Actually replacing the cord shouldn't cost more than $50. that said, remember this when machine shopping "you get what you pay for". It's a lot like car shopping, don't buy a used Hyundai Elantra if you need a Chevy truck.
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