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Unread 06-02-2013, 11:34 AM   #1
anticlockclock
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First time using bondo - did I do it wrong???

So I did my first coat of bondo on my power ranger helmet I am crafting and someone questioned the fact that I did the bondo all over it and asked if it was going to cause trouble with seeing the details??? I haven't found a decent tutorial anywhere so I basically am freestyling this part - am I doing this right?? Also how many coats of bondo should I use?

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.n...81908559_n.jpg

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...11930926_n.jpg

Last edited by anticlockclock : 06-02-2013 at 11:35 AM. Reason: adding pictures
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Unread 06-02-2013, 02:08 PM   #2
ghosgreen
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Yeah unfortunately there aren't very many detailed tutorials on how to do the bondo stage. Main thing to keep in mind is that bondo is like sculpting. You're trying to shape the bondo and just help even out the rough edges on your pep if that makes sense. So for a first time not bad. Just keep in mind you might have trouble finding the details. It was something I did my first time. But don't worry it's workable. It's just it might be more difficult to maintain those details. When I do bondo I usually work in small sections at a time so I can catch those details. As for layers it depends. Usually three to four layers but again it really depends. So your first layer you want to sand it but don't sand it all the way down. If you do that then you'll just be taking off the bondo you just put on. You're trying to build up on the bondo so you can smooth out your helmet. So just sand the those high parts with your 60 grit sandpaper to bring it down and then put on your next layer of bondo.

I hope that makes sense...sorry I can explain this better in person and not so well with just typing. Anyways not bad looking keep it up.
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Unread 06-03-2013, 07:35 AM   #3
Penlowe
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the smoother it goes on, the less sanding you need to do.
What tool did you use to apply it? While a lot of people use putty knives, I recommend a cake spatula- NOT your moms' favorite one out of the kitchen m'kay? Bondo is not food safe and no tools should be returned to the kitchen after use with Bondo.

http://www.jubileesweetarts.com/kitc...cake-spatula-8

these come in a lot of sizes, for a helmet a 4" or 5" would be just right.

EDIT: If you want to practice making smooth passes, bake a cake and ice it! It's the exact same techniques, and unlike Bondo, you can eat your mistakes in cake. Or you could just buy cheap icing (cheap kinds are often denser, making a better practice medium for Bondo) and ice various things from your kitchen, an upside down bowl, a cup, a square pan, etc.
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Last edited by Penlowe : 06-03-2013 at 07:40 AM.
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Unread 06-03-2013, 03:45 PM   #4
anticlockclock
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Thanks for the tips. I've been using a plastic giftcard to apply the bondo.
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Unread 06-03-2013, 10:14 PM   #5
ghosgreen
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Nice giftcards my favorite. I got the spreaders you can buy at the store but I just prefer using those giftcards. Having an easier time with them. Anyways good luck and keep practicing. This stuff just takes practice in the end.

Also Penlowe that sounds like an awesome idea for practice! I gotta remember that one.
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Unread 06-04-2013, 10:50 AM   #6
anticlockclock
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This is where I'm at thus far: https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...80106439_n.jpg
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Unread 06-04-2013, 10:57 AM   #7
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Also, need a little advice for the mouth... it is very thin and the dashed lines from the cardstock can be seen - should i add more bondo or will it not be a problem since im going to be putting a couple coats of paint on top of it?

I am satisfied with the smoothness of it and that the lips can still be seen but just worried that its too thin even though I have massive amounts of fiberglass cloth on the inside of the mouth.
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Unread 06-04-2013, 04:54 PM   #8
Penlowe
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are we going for glassy smooth? or battle worn?

if glassy smooth is your goal, you need another coat of bondo and more sanding, I see divots that are too deep for paint to fill.
This is where I would use a very small tool or even just my fingers, start with a toothpaste glob sized bit and carefully run it over the depressions that need filling. essentially not putting a new layer on, only filling low spots. it'll still need sanding but the finer detailed approach will give you a nice look.
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Unread 06-05-2013, 02:44 AM   #9
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I definitely want a smooth look but just having trouble. I feel like it clumps up too fast or I get too much on there and it creates another coat to sand down. I added a layer to the mouth and smooth it with my gloved fingers the best I could. I also added to the teeth where the visor will be and sanded down big time. Kinda upset I am loosing detail from certain sharp corners and whatnot. I think I am smoothing it down too much and making it more round than it should be but I want it DONE. I feel like I am just writing, erasing, writing again, and erasing my work over and over and I feel like if I do that too much the whole thing will just become scrap. Ive already used almost a whole half gallon of Bondo and that stuff isn't cheap.

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...29768559_n.jpg

https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...55906598_n.jpg
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Unread 06-05-2013, 05:08 AM   #10
ghosgreen
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Okay okay first off slow down. You are very close. At this point go very light on the bondo. Right now you're just trying to fill in those divets and smooth out your piece. So start making small batches of bondo and I mean very small batches and work in small areas. For example only start working on one cheek first and slightly sand it down. Like you said if you add too much it's like you're erasing what you just put on. So go light on the bondo and the sanding. Sand down only those high parts but not too much. Trust me you are so close right now.
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Unread 06-05-2013, 07:31 AM   #11
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your sanding needs to be minimized. If you are still using 80 or 100 at this point, yeah you are just erasing your work. At this stage you should be using 220-320 grit. You can also get ladies paper nail files for sanding the crisp edges, cheaper and easier to use that the fancy sanding pads sold for similar applications.

Cut your sandpaper down to smaller pieces, like 2" squares.
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Unread 06-06-2013, 12:36 AM   #12
anticlockclock
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Thanks for the advice - I have been using a more rough grit.. like 60 :O but I will go to a more smooth grit. In my mind I was just thinking using a rougher grit would smooth out all the indents better. Back to the shop I go.
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Unread 06-06-2013, 07:20 AM   #13
Penlowe
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Ah1 Well that makes sense. Well now you know why they sell sandpaper in multi packs of 80, 110, 160, 200, 240.... as the project is more refined, you go up in number to get a smoother surface.

Sand paper goes all the way to 800 grit, but you won't need that for this project, 300 should be sufficient (800 grit will take metal to a nice shine). Past that there are steel wools that have numbers 1, 0, 00, 000, 0000. The more zeroes the finer it is. 000 steel wool gives metal a high jewelry finish polish.
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Unread 06-06-2013, 01:53 PM   #14
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Update: using a finer grit of sandpaper and added bondo to a couple dents and dings - added to the teeth. https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...05241080_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.n...34125615_n.jpg

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...45660286_n.jpg
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Unread 06-07-2013, 07:06 AM   #15
Penlowe
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there ya go! you should be at the 300-ish now.
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