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Unread 06-30-2013, 03:46 AM   #16
dvt
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ty curiousity for clicking this thread, i have learned some interesting tips
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Unread 06-30-2013, 04:45 AM   #17
Kelley
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While people can build up tolerances to pain killers, using something like Ibuprofen a few days every month is seriously not going to do that.

I cannot possibly recommend going without them if you actually need them. Back when I was having a period I needed 6-800mg every 4 hours or I would not be able to do everyday tasks. It was debilitating. That 6-800mg was constant for literally years (it would depend on the day how many I needed to take - I could judge by the pain how many I'd need).

Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory. If 800mg isn't working, I'd see a doctor about the possibilities of a bigger problem like endometriosis or otherwise.

Or do what I did - go on a pill that cycles three months on and one month off. I never have periods even on the off months now and I see absolutely no downside to this.

"Natural remedies" are great and all, but pharmaceuticals were invented for a reason. Like, so people don't have to live their lives in a ridiculous amount of pain. Stuff like that. And so that infections don't kill you. So that people don't have to live in iron lungs. I don't want to be too mean or snarky and I know you want to help, but you have to understand that not everyone has a light and manageable amount of pain - the big bold statement with a small disclaimer later one honestly felt a bit offensive, sorry.
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Unread 07-01-2013, 03:57 AM   #18
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@Kelley: I understand where you're coming from, but the one thing I find offensive on my part is that I'm not one of those with "light and manageable pain," otherwise I would not be starting this thread. Especially when I first started out periods I had ones that too were so painful I was rolling around in bed in pain. Did I have painkillers/ibuprofen/panadol/etc? No I didn't. My mother simply didn't consider giving me any. I wasted an entire day in bed in pain, trying to sleep the pain off, even nightmares where my uterus as throbbing.

Of course I understand that maybe not everybody wants to waste a day in bed or to endure it, and that is more than fine with me. I'm just sharing my experience with what I have seen and happen in my close family members. People who like to take painkillers eventually need stronger and stronger ones until even the strongest don't work anymore. Do I take painkillers? No, not unless periods strike during exams. Do they work? Hell yeah, of course they do, but no way do I have to take them periodically in large doses.

Unless proven scientifically that our human bodies don't do this, I'm sticking with my original theory. Pharmaceuticals were invented with more than one purpose in mind. Just like how dog food was invented with the intention of 1) Easy meals for owners and 2) To leech money off people as well. What did dogs eat before we had canned dog food? Oh I dunno, canned dog food from the future? So how did females survive before pharmaceuticals were invented? Pharmacists will never tell you the alternative to pills and drugs because gdi their entire career is based off keeping that knowledge from the rest of us.

I'm really sorry if this came off as a bit mean or offensive, I guess I'm one of those people who will search for any other non-drug/pill alternative before giving in. Yes I made this thread to help, yes it's good that you've posted what works for you, but no this is not an education class on what is right and wrong, only what has worked for us individually and what has not.
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Unread 07-01-2013, 04:02 AM   #19
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As a general reply to the other commenters:

Less greasy food etc does seem to lessen the pain. If you read up on raw foodists, a lot of them don't even have menstrual cycles anymore, but for those that do, they experience lighter, less painful periods. Hence why a lot of them are very convinced that raw food is supposed to be good for us ^q^
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Unread 07-01-2013, 10:57 AM   #20
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I don't know if this would help at all for the level of pain you are talking about. But I tend to use a sock filled with rice heated in the microwave as an instant heating pad.
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Unread 07-05-2013, 01:13 AM   #21
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Lol reason I hate being a chick. Unfortunantly for me I get the worst where I have to get an ultrasound a year and been prescribed ibuprofen 800+ the only thing I can do is keep my mind busy while my insides decided to have a war. >< and to make matters worse it goes for two weeks

What my friend do is put her lilttle pomeranian pup on her abdomen while drinking chamomile and peppermint tea loose leaf. She says it works well....lucky turd.
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Unread 07-06-2013, 08:09 AM   #22
Sallymae
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I know the pain is really annoying and sometimes unbearable; working out really does help. If you feel your period symptoms coming like slightly bloated, minor back ache, try to take a long fast paced walk, go to the gym, do some DDR anything to break a slight sweat, I find it helps the most for me and I used to have to leave school due to period pains
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Unread 07-06-2013, 09:24 AM   #23
Kelley
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The history of sex and reproduction is really interesting, but it doesn't hold many secrets that modern people would find appealing, unfortunately.

People often ask what was done about periods before the modern age - and the answer is that there just weren't as many periods... er... period.

People in general suffered poor nutrition as little as 100 years ago. It was only at around that point that things were starting to come together. Poor nutrition leads to sporadic and infrequent menstruation - which is something that some experience even today. Being underweight can also impact this, as is seen in youth athletics sometimes - it can delay puberty.

Historically, the age of first menstruation was higher than it is today - quite significantly so. It was normal to have one's first period from the ages 15-17 - a remarkable contrast to today. Some blame hormones in the food, others say it's simply better nutrition - a factor that has lead to people growing taller than ever, too. Whatever the case, there are now more years of active menstruation than historically. The process of ovulation takes a great deal of biological resources and isn't something the body wants to do when it is lacking them over-all and of course a pregnancy would take even more resources !

Another thing to consider is the difference in how people lived and reproduced. Nowadays it's not uncommon for a person to wait until age 25 or later to have their first child - but this was not the case in much of human history. When people cite average lifespans of "20 years" in the age of Shakespeare it doesn't mean that humans were only living to the age of 20 on average - the infant mortality rate is what is dragging that down. People lived to be 60 and 70 in the 1590s just as they do today, which is certainly surprising to some ! Think about how many children died so very young to drag that average lifespan down so incredibly low. And of course, these children had be be conceived and the ones who were capable of menstruation were the ones giving birth to them.

The point is, they spent many more years and months pregnant than today. From conception to breastfeeding it could give a person two or more years of no periods at all - and we remember that MANY of these children were not surviving, nevermind the miscarriages. Life was pretty rough, yeah. And even families who were poor needed children so that they could have the extra help on the farm or later send the child to work in a factory for added income. So having children as soon as possible was desirable - it wasn't something to sit and wait on for the vast majority. Those who weren't poor had political interests in mind - think of King Henry the VIII and his wives and the importance of having a child to carry on the family name, and daughters to establish political connections. Interestingly, these were the ones who married younger - to sooner establish connections, those who were poorer tended to marry somewhat later and have more freedom in doing so (at least in the Western world). Having children wasn't something that people "thought about" until they were 30 and "felt their biological clock ticking". It was an essential part of life much more so than it is today.

And this brings us to the effects of pregnancies on the body. Carrying and delivering a child can actually correct conditions that result in especially painful periods such as misalignment of the uterus, and of course there are other hormonal changes after such an incredibly feat of biology. This would provide relief even if the person would menstruate in-between having children.

Of course modern women in general don't really like the idea of having a child just to ease these pains so they seek other relief. There were doubtlessly those who did suffer and did the things that we still do today such as using a hot rag or drinking teas - those who were "unfit" to marry or simply never had a chance to, they did exist but they were in the minority and had a variety of experiences just like we do today. As someone else mentions, the production of endorphins from physical activity can help lessen the experience of pain - and was certainly something that would have been used historically - when you need to be producing product or labour to sustain your household or livelihood you don't get to "take a day off", the fruit will not harvest itself and will rot of freeze if left too long - so physical activity was a larger part of some people's lives (there are certainly physically demanding jobs still today and classes of people who would have had "comfortable" lives historically - so it goes both ways). In those situations, you have to work through the pain, you don't have a choice - and other discomforts were so present that what people would define as "comfortable" would be very different than today. I don't think this is necessarily better or worse, it's just different - letting cavities rot through a tooth or letting a wound heal improperly causing prolonged pain in order to make someone "stronger" is not the solution I would propose.

A body can build up tolerance to something like Ibuprofen, but even when taken on a daily basis this can take months to develop for the average person. Taking it several times a month isn't a danger in this regard. In fact, taking it a day or so before the period even starts can work on the biological processes that create "cramps" so that even less needs to be taken ! I understand it can be difficult to predict, especially when one is young, but the fact is that NSAID pain relievers work directly on the biological processes that produce menstrual cramps and are a first line of relief. It's not just dulling the pain your brain feels, it's reducing the inflammation which is itself painful. It is working on the actual source of pain by preventing the formation of various prostaglandins before they even exist. This is like giving your body armour and of course is more effective if you use it before the inflammation can even begin - it's not even like the removal of a thorn, it's like preventing the thorn from piercing you in the first place if used most effectively.

Ibuprofen is considered one of the most important advances in modern medicine for a reason. It is incredibly useful in many situations - not just to "dull pain" as an abstract concept.

There are certainly adverse effects of Ibuprofen, but they would not be experienced at normal usage as directed for over the counter medication or under supervision of a medical professional. People have these problems when they self-medicate without consultation or take the pills multiple times a day, every day. If a person's period pain lasts that long it's an indication of an underlying condition that should instead be treated.

Before canned dog food dogs ate meat and other human "leftovers". This is actually fairly inconvenient for a family to store when it's not a byproduct for their daily lives. Who has room for that in their refrigerators ?- it takes up much more space than something designed to contain the same nutrients in a more compact, concentrated form. And let's be fair - our modern true "leftovers" are likely even less nutritious than they were thousands of years ago in that it's really not a great idea to feed the dog slices of old pizza for its food. Thus, "dog food" was invented as a way to supply our canine companions with the nutrients they need to survive while being easy for humans to store and much less perishable than the "natural" alternative.

Yes, there are problems with the pharmaceutical industry and the dog food industry, but they are not flawed concepts to start with (although if one has the space there are people who make their own dog or cat food, which is certainly good for absolute control - but not possible for all people). The problem with dog food is when the need for it is taken advantage of by companies who do not impart all the necessary nutrients, who skimp and add fillers, who have poor quality control - these are the problems, not the "dog food" as an idea.

It is important to be a critical consumer and look into the nature of things. I don't mean any of this in a condescending way, just as an interesting look into our history. We can learn a lot from history and it is fascinating what things we cannot learn - what things have arisen so recently in our human history as to be "new" to our experience.
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Disclaimer : This post written by a Grumpy Old Man

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- Wind Waker starter costume in swim material
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Unread 07-10-2013, 01:26 AM   #24
VioletSometime
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I have always had excruciating period pain, nausa and vomitting (especially when I was younger). It was so bad at one stage if I didn't have neurofen within the first few hours of it starting, I would throw up everytime. Since becoming a vegetarian and eating a lot of more natural foods it has helped but I also still have a difficult time. Nice hot baths help a lot and sometimes cold showers can help with the nausea.

Lately, the week before my period I've been getting a lot of nausea and a loss of appetite whereas in the past I've always been very hungry. Does anyone else have this too?
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Unread 07-12-2013, 02:32 AM   #25
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Period pains are the ultimate of suck. Sadly, I can't offer too great advice, because I am still dying of period pains, but this is what I can say:

I ended up with anxiety due to a bad event with my period at the end of last year. I've suffered vomitting, fainting and nausea, and have taken all sorts of anti-inflammation medication like ibuprofen or naproxen, but none have worked. Ibuprofen actually screwed up my period, so, I don't really recommend taking it, unless your doctor says to.

I heard yoga is good, also regular exercise, as well as maintaining a good diet... but I do none of those things (har har har).

Usually when I get bad cramps I use heat packs. My mother found these great heat packs that you stick to the inside of your clothing so they're indiscreet, and heat up within a few minutes and stay relatively hot for up to 12 hours. Unfortunately, you can't sleep with them on, but it's way better than lugging a huge wheat pack/water bottle around all day. The brand of these things is Hotteeze.

Another problem that could cause cramps is a lack of magnesium. If you find yourself often craving chocolate around your monthly cycle, maybe try taking magnesium supplements or eating more foods with magnesium as it could be a reason why. (Though, this could always not be the reason. I tried magnesium for a few months and it did nothing.)

If you are getting bad cramps, maybe go to your doctor and get referred to a gynaecologist to get it checked out. Sometimes bad cramps could be symptoms for ovarian cysts or even endometriosis.

Also, a gynaecologist can recommend more things to help with your cramps. Seriously, they are great and way better than just going to your doctor. It's better to ask a gynaecologist for advice because they specialise in this stuff.

For example, recently I went to Japan for five weeks for homestay, so my gynaecologist gave me Ralovera to take, and it helped prevent bleeding and cramps so I was able to enjoy the trip as much as possible. I had lost all hope beforehand, though, because I had tried going on the pill not long ago, but I had a health precaution and therefore had to stop, and I was really worried I wouldn't be able to keep it under control while in Japan. But it was handled pretty well!

I also did take the mini pill for a while and that helped (a little), so maybe you could ask your doctor/gyno about it.

Be aware that a lot of these medications, i.e. the pill, can be dangerous though.
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Unread 07-17-2013, 05:03 PM   #26
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Maybe i'm the only one, but orgasm tends to throw off the cramping rhythm when i'm having a really bad day.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 04:35 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThakYuki View Post
I've always heard bananas help with period cramps due to the high potassium.

As for me, I'm 24 and still dealing with a debilitating first day of cramps. I try to bear the pain with a heating pad till I just can't take it anymore. I take acetaminophen (Tylenol) with a caffeinated soda when the pain gets too bad. I rarely take pain meds, and Tylenol is the only thing that makes my cramps bearable during day 1. I know aspirin works better, but I am super sensitive to aspirin and can't take it during my period.

At the mention of birth control: I've read that you're really not supposed to be on it for more than a few years. I used to be on it for about 3 years. When I stopped taking it, I noticed I stopped having crazy mood swings, which included really bad bouts of depression, and I stopped getting migraines. I've felt much better in the year and a half so far that I've been off of it.

I'm not saying you shouldn't get on the pill, just make sure to do research before you decide if it's really for you.
I had a /bit/ of a traumatic experience with birth control myself. While it was nice to have it regular for a bit, I can no longer use fully hormonal birth control methods.

I switched from the Ortho Evra patch to the mini-pill. I noticed myself being EXTREMELY irritable the entire time I was taking it. About a week or so after I stopped taking it, I noticed that my mood swings (which had caused my husband and I to be at eachother's throats previously) dissipated almost entirely.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 04:38 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucifenia View Post
Period pains are the ultimate of suck. Sadly, I can't offer too great advice, because I am still dying of period pains, but this is what I can say:

I ended up with anxiety due to a bad event with my period at the end of last year. I've suffered vomitting, fainting and nausea, and have taken all sorts of anti-inflammation medication like ibuprofen or naproxen, but none have worked. Ibuprofen actually screwed up my period, so, I don't really recommend taking it, unless your doctor says to.

I heard yoga is good, also regular exercise, as well as maintaining a good diet... but I do none of those things (har har har).

Usually when I get bad cramps I use heat packs. My mother found these great heat packs that you stick to the inside of your clothing so they're indiscreet, and heat up within a few minutes and stay relatively hot for up to 12 hours. Unfortunately, you can't sleep with them on, but it's way better than lugging a huge wheat pack/water bottle around all day. The brand of these things is Hotteeze.

Another problem that could cause cramps is a lack of magnesium. If you find yourself often craving chocolate around your monthly cycle, maybe try taking magnesium supplements or eating more foods with magnesium as it could be a reason why. (Though, this could always not be the reason. I tried magnesium for a few months and it did nothing.)

If you are getting bad cramps, maybe go to your doctor and get referred to a gynaecologist to get it checked out. Sometimes bad cramps could be symptoms for ovarian cysts or even endometriosis.

Also, a gynaecologist can recommend more things to help with your cramps. Seriously, they are great and way better than just going to your doctor. It's better to ask a gynaecologist for advice because they specialise in this stuff.

For example, recently I went to Japan for five weeks for homestay, so my gynaecologist gave me Ralovera to take, and it helped prevent bleeding and cramps so I was able to enjoy the trip as much as possible. I had lost all hope beforehand, though, because I had tried going on the pill not long ago, but I had a health precaution and therefore had to stop, and I was really worried I wouldn't be able to keep it under control while in Japan. But it was handled pretty well!

I also did take the mini pill for a while and that helped (a little), so maybe you could ask your doctor/gyno about it.

Be aware that a lot of these medications, i.e. the pill, can be dangerous though.
The mini pill does not have nearly as many hormones as the standard pill, patch, etc. Also, progestrone doesn't have the same negative effects as estrogen. It can make you cranky, though.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 10:44 AM   #29
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I find that heat packs/hot water bottles tend to make the pain worse. that's just me. my friend takes these pain killers that are really good, i will get the name off her and reply again with the name. they say to stir away from caffeine, which can aggravate it. i hate resorting to pain killers but i end of taking them because its too painful for me also. apparently there is some foods that you can eat also that reduce the severity of the pain. maybe look that up. hope it helps, goodluck
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Unread 08-23-2013, 12:18 PM   #30
ShimaGenki
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahAU View Post
Maybe i'm the only one, but orgasm tends to throw off the cramping rhythm when i'm having a really bad day.
Nope, that's actually "a proven thing," according to one of my nursing textbooks... xD

Anyway, on the painkiller issue: it's not a problem when you take one every once in a while when you need it. What's scary is when people pop four tablets in one time period--I want to grab them and scream!! If two doesn't work, just try something else--yikes! D: If you feel you can go without the painkillers, more power to you. But if you try to wait until you absolutely can't anymore, if you try to take something it's likely too late. There's a concept of being "on top of the pain" and taking something before it's out of control. I've learned these lesson all too often as my body is made that frequent headaches are a normal thing for me. If it's been hanging around for a while, I'll take an ibuprofen.

If menstrual cramps are an ongoing problem that can't be remedied with methods of heat, OTC painkillers, etc., I'd definitely see a family doctor or gynecologist on the issue. Birth control can help level your cycle and bring down the level of pain. When I started birth control when I was 18, I found it did wonders in controlling my periods. It does come with risks, but so long as you don't smoke and get regular exercise I'd say you'll be fine.

(Why did I never think of bananas!? DUH. I'll have to try that next time~)
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