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Unread 10-26-2013, 08:30 PM   #1
BlindBandit11
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Tsubasa Fai coat help/advice

I am considering cosplaying Fai from Tsubasa Reservoir Chronicles however as I have never worked on design work this extensive I am a bit hesitant.
My question is would a method of dye/painting such as in this tutorial or world cutting the shapes from fabric and a thin interfacing to sew on work?
As I do not have the most study hand while doing anything with a paint brush I am worried about the finished product of this if I am to paint it.

Reference picture of the costume (hopefully it is fixed)
http://redgea.tripod.com/tsubasa_res...dition_Fye.jpg

Last edited by BlindBandit11 : 10-26-2013 at 08:44 PM. Reason: broken link
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Unread 10-26-2013, 08:39 PM   #2
Evil Bishounen
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Your reference pic doesn't work. I see a Tripod placeholder image.

There isn't necessarily one single "correct" way to do something. With anime and game costumes, there's a lot of interpretation involved when translating it to real life. People will often go with whatever skills they feel they're best at.

I see a reference in that tutorial you linked to, and I've seen lots of different takes on this particular costume. I've seen some people paint it, and I've seen other people applique the entire thing. Some have made it out of satin, others out of fleece. There is no one right way to do it.

If you feel you don't have the steady hand for painting, then don't paint it. Either do what you think you can do well, or take on the challenge of improving or learning a new task. If you want to applique it because you feel you're better at applique, then do it. If you really think it would look better painted, and you sincerely want to paint it, then look into techniques to help you improve your painting skills and produce more even edges.
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Unread 10-26-2013, 08:49 PM   #3
BlindBandit11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evil Bishounen View Post
Your reference pic doesn't work. I see a Tripod placeholder image.

There isn't necessarily one single "correct" way to do something. With anime and game costumes, there's a lot of interpretation involved when translating it to real life. People will often go with whatever skills they feel they're best at.

I see a reference in that tutorial you linked to, and I've seen lots of different takes on this particular costume. I've seen some people paint it, and I've seen other people applique the entire thing. Some have made it out of satin, others out of fleece. There is no one right way to do it.

If you feel you don't have the steady hand for painting, then don't paint it. Either do what you think you can do well, or take on the challenge of improving or learning a new task. If you want to applique it because you feel you're better at applique, then do it. If you really think it would look better painted, and you sincerely want to paint it, then look into techniques to help you improve your painting skills and produce more even edges.
I do apologize about the broken link (I do believe I fixed it)

Thank you, I will take all this into consideration.
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Unread 10-27-2013, 09:33 AM   #4
Penlowe
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Personally, I think it looks like a rich, elegant coat, and paint rarely looks rich or elegant, no matter how well it is applied. Besides, applique allows greater creativity in textures, if the base coat is fuzzy fleece, a satin motif will stand out that much more and look really awesome.

scaling up the pattern is half way to applique, once you've got those to scale, tracing them onto wonder-under-ed fabric and ironing it all in place is a tad easier than tracing and painting clean lines.
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Unread 10-27-2013, 10:02 AM   #5
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I took the original jpg file's name and put it into google and got this:
http://s23.photobucket.com/user/Vamp...n_Fye.jpg.html

Is that the picture you were linking?
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Unread 10-27-2013, 12:56 PM   #6
AlbinoShadow
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When I did this same cosplay I appliqued everything. Penlowe is absolutely right that paint was not rich enough, in my mind, let alone neat enough when used directly on the coat fabric. Actually I ruined my first hood piece trying to paint the pattern directly on x3
I instead started off with fabric that was already blue and used navy blue fabric paint for the shading. Here are some of the progress shots:

Appliques right after being sewn
I stitched them up inside out, then turned them right side out and ironed them so raw edges would not show.

After ironing, but before painting

First application of paint
The paint is a wash. First I applied water to the fabric, then the watered down paint so that it would blend smoothly into the fabric colour.

After final layer of paint
The darkest colour is paint applied directly from the jar without being watered down, then blended into the fabric with a brush.

Finnally, applique pieces before I stitched them onto the coat

The finished coat:
http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i2...ps04154620.jpg
http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i2...ps42817d34.jpg

No, mine wasn't the most efficient method. Yes, there are other methods that could have achieved a similar effect. Still I hope that this will be of some help to you!

Last edited by AlbinoShadow : 10-27-2013 at 01:01 PM.
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Unread 10-27-2013, 09:28 PM   #7
Aqua's Rhapsody
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Do whatever method you feel the most comfortable doing. However, I definitely disagree with the comments mentioning that painting isn't rich enough because I have certainly see Fai coats painted that have come out absolutely beautiful, but it is a difficult task.
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Unread 10-28-2013, 09:27 PM   #8
BlindBandit11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lemuries View Post
I took the original jpg file's name and put it into google and got this:
http://s23.photobucket.com/user/Vamp...n_Fye.jpg.html

Is that the picture you were linking?
Yes that is the picture I was linking to, sorry for any confusion.

Quote:
When I did this same cosplay I appliqued everything. Penlowe is absolutely right that paint was not rich enough, in my mind, let alone neat enough when used directly on the coat fabric. Actually I ruined my first hood piece trying to paint the pattern directly on x3
I instead started off with fabric that was already blue and used navy blue fabric paint for the shading. Here are some of the progress shots:
Your coat turned out beautifully.
I may incorporate aspects your how you made yours if you do not mind?
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