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Unread 06-14-2005, 03:07 PM   #1
Solaria
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Sewing Terminology

After reading the thread about creating a Sewing Forum in the Site Suggestions area, I posted that I thought it might be useful to start a thread about different sewing terminology. As I said there, it seems a lot of people, especially those who taught themselves to sew by playing around and didn't learn from someone with sewing skills, don't know what terms such as "basting", "princess seams", etc, mean when they are mentioned in other threads. So- post away with your different sewing terms!

Perhaps if this thread gets popular, it could get stickied by a mod? I can see it possibly becoming a good resource, especially for beginners. Also, if this would fit better in Cosplay Newbies, feel free to move it, although I think it could be beneficial for everyone- after all, no one ever knows everything!
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Last edited by Solaria : 06-14-2005 at 03:09 PM.
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Unread 06-14-2005, 09:05 PM   #2
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I think it's a great idea. I'm a newbie so it'd be wonderfully helpful to me.
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Unread 06-15-2005, 01:14 AM   #3
Eleryth
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sewing.org's
Sewing Terminology page
and their Sewing Equipment and Checklist page (has sewing machine checklist, tools list for measuring, marking, pressing, misc, and last but not least, for sewing).

Simplicity's Basics has sections with "what are darts?", "What is bias tape?", "What is stay stitching?", and "what is seam allowance?". It also has tips and other things like that.

There was a huge terminology page I had once.... gotta see if I can find it again.

About.com's Sewing terminology "library"
Sewingweb.com's Sewing Dictionary

I would not want to copy and paste out these dictionaries/guides - they are FAR too long. I suggest if the person doesn't know what it is, check one of the dictionaries or search google, and if they are still confused or it doesn't happen to be in there, then ask about it.
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Last edited by Eleryth : 09-01-2005 at 06:49 PM. Reason: typo
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Unread 06-29-2005, 04:01 AM   #4
TenshiKaitou
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i'm certainly one of those clueless ones. I invented my own sewing pattern, so no problem about that. The problem is the clothing cut..! I always seem to screw up on that. The first clothing I sew was Akabane Kurodo's coat. Let just say the material was pretty short after I cut out the shape. So I ended up patching on more cloth, it's a wonder the finished product didn't looked like Frankestein himself. But I was lucky. And the second costume which I'm working on now is Luffy's vest. Halfway through, I realised, yep, too tight...AGAIN! T__T;;

Edited: on a second thought, it really is hard to measure yourself since nobody was there to help...XD

Last edited by TenshiKaitou : 06-29-2005 at 04:08 AM.
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Unread 06-29-2005, 09:36 PM   #5
Romann
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Here's a pretty helpful site that goes over cleaning your machine. Many people tend to overlook the lint build-up that can occur.

http://www.ehow.com/how_5064_clean-sewing-machine.html
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Unread 07-04-2005, 12:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleryth
sewing.org's
Sewing Terminology page
and their Sewing Equipment and Checklist page (has sewing machine checklist, tools list for measuring, marking, pressing, misc, and last but not least, for sewing).

Simplicity's Basics has sections with "what are darts?", "What is bias tape?", "What is stay stitching?", and "what is seam allowance?". It also has tips and other things like that.

There was a huge terminology page I had once.... gotta see if I can find it again.

About.com's Sewing terminology "library"
Sewingweb.com's Sewing Dictionary
Those are some great links, Eleryth! I've been sewing for about 12 years now (my lord, has it been that long?) and I learned a few new things on those. But the definitions they have for flat felling seem a little weird. None of them read like any of the flat felling I've been taught. I'd probably have to define that as pressing the seam allowances to one side, trim the bottom allowance down slightly, folding the top allowance raw edge under and then sewing the allowances down. But I have to give them credit for pointing to jeans for demonstrating what flat felling looks like. Tho I'd also point to Japanese kimono.... most kimono makers flat fell all the seam allowances (tho not always since all the seam allowances are selvedges).
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Unread 07-24-2005, 07:21 PM   #7
Solaria
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From the thread on Fabric Types, I've quoted Dia's information:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dia
Sorry, took me a while to dig up my textbook and notes! If anyone has information that conflicts with this, please share it, as I could be wrong here or there:

Bottomweight: I believe this is really just a general term describing fabrics suitable for pants, suits, skirts, that sort of thing. Things you would wear on your bottom half, haha. A lot of fabrics fall into this category - there are also topweights, which are lighter and better for tops and whatnot.

Knit: Knits are made from interloopings of yarns, rather than woven yarns like woven fabrics. The threads are actually knitted together by a machine, adding loops upon loops to make the fabric. Knits are used when a close fit is needed, but you don't really want darts or lots of seams. Knits allow for a greater ease of movement, due to their inherent stretch. Granted, not ALL knits have a suitable amount of stretch (i.e. thick doubleknits), but most do, and that's what they're known for.

Suiting: Suiting is, as one might expect, perfect for suits. Suitings tend to be light- to medium-weight fabrics that hold their shape well and have a nice drape. They often have a significant wool fiber content, as wool is the traditional fiber used in suits. Depending on their weight, gabardine and crepe (among other fabrics) would fall into this category.

Brocade: REAL brocade is a heavy, luxurious woven with an all-over slightly raised jacquard design, formed by threads added into the body of the fabric during the weaving. Many cheaper, lighter-weight brocades are made nowadays, and are easy to find (i.e. the Asian-inspired satiny brocades you see at JoAnn's and whatnot).

Twill: Twill is actually a particular weave of fabric, as well as a fabric itself. A twill weave has the appearance of diagonal line on one side, with the lines running in the opposite direction on the reverse. Many fabrics have twill weaves - denim, gabardine, chino, and the fabric known as twill itself, to name a few. The twill weave is also used to create the pattern known as herringbone, which is alternating columns of diagonal lines, which form a repeated chevron design.

Sateen: Sateen is the same as satin, but made from cotton. Satin is actually a type of weave, like twill, that has a fabric named after it. (If you'd like me to explain the weave, let me know, but I'll have to give a bunch of background on the terminology and whatnot). The satin weave is what gives satin its high shine, and sateen its subtle sheen. Satin is shinier because it is made exclusively from filament yarns (either silk or synthetic), which are longer and smoother than the cotton yarns used in sateen, resulting in the smoothness and shine.

Hope that helps some. If there are any more fabric type questions, I'd be happy to try and help. It's a good review before I go back to school, haha.
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Unread 07-24-2005, 08:00 PM   #8
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Adding in Claireon's post from a thread suggested by Parasauropholus (sp?).

Quote:
Originally Posted by claireon
Browse the info at http://www.fabrics.net . They have lots of info about . . . well, fabrics, and different kinds of fabrics.

Basically, there are two categories of fabric "type" that people often confuse. There's the fiber content, and then there's knit/weave. The fiber content means what the stuff is literally made of--natural fibers like cotton(grows in fields), silk(spun by worms), hemp(umm . . . some kind of plant), wool(baaa), and synthetic, man-made fibers like rayon, acrylic, polyester, other stuff with disgusting names (all basically made of plastic ). And, of course, there are blends of different fabrics. (A bit of spandex in a cotton weave will give it some stretch, some man-made fibers resist wrinkling, etc.)

Then there's the knit or weave of the fabric--the way the fibers are arranged or aligned in the fabric. Ever had a toy weaving loom? Weaves are the same deal--over and under, over and under--except there are a whole bunch of different sequences they can use to make weaves from just the simple once-over once-under deal. Twill, like described above, is a really tough weave, and has a pattern across the surface that looks like diagonal lines--just look at your jeans. Ever crocheted or knitted? That's knits for you. Not as rigid as weaves, more stretchy and fluid. Just like with weaves, there are a zillion different knit "patterns." Look at a chunky sweater--that's a knit. Most T-shirts are knits, just a lot denser than that sweater. A common T-shirt knit is jersey.

So you have fiber content and knit/weave. Now you can describe a fabric. So cotton twill is a twill weave made with cotton fibers. A lot of people confuse fiber types with weave types--satin and gabardine, for instance, are types of weaves. You can have silk satin or polyester satin--it's the weave of the fibers that makes the surface shiny.

Your choice of fabric depends on weight, drape (how much it should cling vs. how much it should stand up on its own), comfort (synthetics can be really hot), fabric care (you can't iron or machine-wash some synthetics), and body/crispness (Want pleats? You need a fabric that can hold them.)

. . . I'm sorry if you knew a lot of this already. I'm just ramblin', and I figured everybody who asks a question represents a bunch of other lurkers who are afraid to ask.
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Unread 08-05-2005, 11:45 PM   #9
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This thread would be most helpful for a sewing n00b like me. I feel I am at others mercey when I need something sewn up or created from fabric. I feel this information here will help inpower people like me to become great cosplayers. On that note does anyone have any links or ideas on good sewing books to read? Ideas on the ideal sewing machine to use? Even thoughts of the ideal sewing environment or setup for a beginner to have?
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Unread 08-06-2005, 06:56 PM   #10
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One of the best sewing books out there is the "Vogue Sewing" book. It's huge and has tons of detailed info on pretty much everything you'll ever need to know. It tells you how to do all sorts of different collars, sleeves, hems, different handstitches, info on different fabric types, how to alter patterns for different body types, etc. I have my mom's one from the 60s (it's still in print, just with some new stuff on spandex and vinly added) and still use it pretty much every time I sew.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...796421-1203905
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Unread 08-07-2005, 03:01 AM   #11
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I agree, that vogue sewing book is excellent
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Unread 09-01-2005, 05:08 PM   #12
ashleyohtori
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Can someone please explain "slip-stitching"? I have already checked out all the websites but I am still confused.

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Unread 09-01-2005, 06:46 PM   #13
Eleryth
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Ashley, slip-stitching is a hand-sewing stitch usually used for closing seams. For example, if you sewed a pillow, you can't sew all the way around with a machine, right? So after it's turned inside out, and the pillow is in, you close the opening with a stitch.

Slip-stitch is common for this. This page has a picture and some directions. http://www.bobvila.com/FixItClub/Tas...IG_Sewing.html
It also has: back stitch, overhand stitch, and crossstitch (all for handsewing, of course).

This page also has instructions.
http://www.geocities.com/diycat/reso...lipstitch.html

I'm not going to try and explain, I'm bad at that. But what I can say is that it appears to be what I've been calling a "closing stitch" or "invisible stitch", since when done right on the fold it can't be seen. Another site called it "whip stitch". Perhaps searching for those terms can help you.

Other helpful sites:

Embroidery Stitches/Stitches
http://inaminuteago.com/

Machine Embroidery Glossary
http://sewing.about.com/library/sewn...ry/aamach6.htm

Fabric University: Dictionary of Fabric Terms
http://www.fabriclink.com/Dictionary.html
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Unread 09-20-2005, 02:33 PM   #14
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How do you top stitch something with a machine, My mother said she would do it for me for my jacket since I need them soon but she isn't the best in explaining things and I rather not get into another argument even though she has been helpful just isn't good at explaining things.
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Unread 09-20-2005, 02:47 PM   #15
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livvylove: Try watching her do it. It's easier to see things like that demonstrated than to try to explain them.

Oh! And here is my contribution to the useful sewing links:
http://www.tudorlinks.com/treasury/a...gstitches.html
Lots of useful hand-sewing stuff there like gathering and making ruffles.

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