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Unread 08-24-2016, 07:13 PM   #1
Yatoiki
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Custom fabric help

Before I get started I would like to say that this is more for near future reference so I don't really have a specific photo in mind.
Anyways I was wondering if there's a way that people can take pictures and turn them into a pattern or if there was a pattern printing company that can interpret your image and make a pattern (This doesn't seem as safe since there's a chance that they could get it wrong)
As an example I have images like these:
http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/...20130705052129


http://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/...20150724113103
Is there a way to somehow copy the image to create the pattern? If not what could I use to create patterns (I don't own Ps btw)
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Unread 08-25-2016, 09:33 PM   #2
Penlowe
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Those pieces are so classic that trying to create the pattern falls into the proverbial "reinventing the wheel". I wouldn't even bother making the blouse or sweater, both can be purchased (look to ladies business wear or uniform companies for the blouse, mens golf sweaters for that). Pleated skirt patterns have been available since patterns became a thing.

For a specific plaid that isn't a traditional Scottish one, try Spoonflower, lots of 'anime' plaids are already there, order the right one and get sewing.

http://www.simplicity.com/burda-styl...sz=30&start=65
http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity....html#start=19
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Unread 08-26-2016, 01:18 PM   #3
Yatoiki
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I was more interested in the pattern and how to recreate certain plaids and such. I found a lovelive one on Spoonflower but I wanted to know how to make my own if there isn't already one. Sorry for any miscommunication I made.
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Unread 08-27-2016, 10:02 AM   #4
Penlowe
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oh the fabric design pattern not the skirt assembly pattern, gotcha.
No, I can't help with that, I'm just not computer program creative, I'm a paper and pencil type. Spoonflower does have a few guidelines on uploading your own stuff, but I only understand half of them, so that's where I'd start.
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Unread 08-28-2016, 01:39 PM   #5
Yatoiki
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ok thank you
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Unread 08-28-2016, 07:53 PM   #6
CapsuleCorp
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Spoonflower has been hit and miss - sometimes the colors that are printed aren't saturated enough, I've heard people say that they have problems with reds, and since it's dye sublimated, sometimes the fabric isn't appropriate for the purpose. I mean, you wouldn't want to try to make a pleated skirt out of a polyester fabric that won't hold a pleat, right? I can't attest to the quality of their fabrics or the different types they offer - I've never ordered from them but I've used fabric purchased from them and sent to me by clients. It's not the worst thing ever but I've been mindful of bad reviews in other parts of these forums/other forums.

If you want complete control over making a plaid, I personally suggest fabric paint over sewing stripes on with ribbon or other fabric. Ribbon can be hard to keep flat, straight, and even when sewing on straight stripes, and it sticks out a bit even if you're using totally thin satin ribbon. It also ends up stiffer than paint. Paint soaks into the fabric so it looks more like it's a part of the fabric, and after a few good ironings, loses the stiffness so many people fear.

The key is to use masking or blue painter's tape to mask off your lines, measure them precisely, and be very very mindful of which colors overlap where on the plaid. Other than that, it's really not hard. I've done both methods and I vastly prefer paint, when I need a custom plaid or pinstripe on a fabric I want to use, like a cotton, linen, or wool. Spoonflower can't print on actual linens and actual wools.
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Unread 08-29-2016, 08:41 PM   #7
Yatoiki
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I'm so glad you warned me, I had heard Spoonflower was iffy but I had totally forgotten. Fabric paint seems like a really good idea, I didn't really think about that. My only question is if fabric paint will look too much like paint on fabric or if it will blend to look like it has been printed into it. Also if there's a specific brand that has great results. Sorry for all the questions.
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Unread 08-30-2016, 08:05 PM   #8
CapsuleCorp
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Questions are what we're all here for.

I swear by Jacquard brand paints because they're a higher quality, and if you need a truly opaque white anywhere, the Neopaque line is what you need. But when it comes to making the paint look like a weave or a print and not a surface treatment, you want to thin it a little with water (but not too much!! or it'll bleed and seep under your masking tape) and make sure it goes into the fibers rather than sitting on top. You don't need some great technique or equipment, just a little patience. Let it dry fully before considering any additional coats of paint, and remember that the more paint you layer on, the less it will look like it's part of the fabric. A second layer might be necessary for some colors, if the first coat dries too thin and you end up with the base color of the fabric showing through too much.
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