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Unread 07-30-2005, 10:00 AM   #61
lainey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koumori
Yup, just slide it over the ribbon before you tie the knot. It took me for-stinking-ever to figure that out. :P
i'll take your word for it and try it out O_O O_O
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Unread 08-01-2005, 07:33 AM   #62
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LOL i just found out that you are only supposed to wear the norigae if you're married O_O
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Unread 08-02-2005, 01:53 AM   #63
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Guess you'd better get hitched then, Lainey! XD Maybe he's trying to tell you something? ^^
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Unread 08-02-2005, 07:55 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleryth
Guess you'd better get hitched then, Lainey! XD Maybe he's trying to tell you something? ^^
LOL!!!

But hey...would it look STRANGE if i wore the norigae too with the hanbok?

i'd never wear the norigae around his parents though LOL
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Unread 08-02-2005, 09:15 AM   #65
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I don't think so. Think of the number of Koreans (or other people) you'd meet who would actually know...it's probably quite low.

I mean, I wear furisode kimono, and I'll soon be 25, and I'll probably wear it even after I'm married, just because it was really expensive. Why wait? And if someone comments, you can say that you do know, but since it was a gift, you wanted to wear it anyway.
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Unread 08-02-2005, 10:13 AM   #66
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Of course not... you'll just look mature. ^_^
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Unread 08-02-2005, 03:38 PM   #67
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I wore my norigae to my graduation and my traditional grandmother was the one who gave it to me, so I think it's safe to say that we Koreans mostly wear it for looks anyhow.

Does anyone still want hanbok wearing mini-tutorial? I could whip one up... ^^
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Unread 08-02-2005, 05:38 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raenef
I wore my norigae to my graduation and my traditional grandmother was the one who gave it to me, so I think it's safe to say that we Koreans mostly wear it for looks anyhow.

Does anyone still want hanbok wearing mini-tutorial? I could whip one up... ^^
yeah that'd be great ^_^ i haven't visited my bf's family yet LOL
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Unread 08-03-2005, 12:40 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rx7grl
How did it come out? I wanted to try out the pattern for folkwear, but i wasn't sure if it's good or not if you could let me know
If I were using the Folkwear pattern again, I'd widen the top band on the ch'ima and make sure it's very stiff and strong so it could be tied around the breasts for support. I'd also double up the skirt fabric, with the inside layer being a stiff fabric like organdy; this would give it more support and make it more like the authentic hanbok I've seen. Also, interface the ties, and watch the lower edge of the jacket. Stay-stitch carefully, and if you are at all large- or low-busted, make a muslin first as you may need to make adjustments.
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Unread 08-03-2005, 10:15 PM   #70
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I'm just curious has there much, if any, talk over the male verison of the han bok? I only known of the one I wore as a very young child(for my 1st birthday), and my mother did offer to get me one for my recent birthday a month ago, but I had declined at the time.
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Unread 08-04-2005, 03:01 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarcasm-hime
I bought a hanbok jacket (chogori?) at a secondhand store awhile back, but it has no ribbons. It just has little ties on the inside to keep it closed, and then tiny loops on the front (one on each side). I assume the loops have a function, but I haven't the foggiest what it is.
It might be an over-jacket... in which case you would need to have buttons for the loops? (like frog closures). I'm not sure though. I'd have to see it to get an idea. ^^;;

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurimono
I'm just curious has there much, if any, talk over the male verison of the han bok? I only known of the one I wore as a very young child(for my 1st birthday), and my mother did offer to get me one for my recent birthday a month ago, but I had declined at the time.
I love the male verson of hanbok. but not much talk of it here. ^^;; They look so comfy compared to the female version. (My grandma used to tie the chima very tightly. x_X) I would try one out if I could get away with it.
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Unread 08-04-2005, 06:21 PM   #72
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I"m rather unaware of of the names of the parts of han bok(I"m guessing chima is the ribbon though). My mother didn't expose me much to Korean culture(I didn't even know what a han bok was until reading a manwha...). Neither do I remember how to speak the language >_<. But learning about it has remain a side interest for me.

I do have pictures of the han bok I wore as a child along with my mother's if anyone likes to see them. However, they aren't HQ pieces that were manufactured rather then each part of the dress maded(my mother's only has a upper and lower part).
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Unread 08-08-2005, 03:38 AM   #73
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Hanbok Help

Here's a quick translation:

Chima= skirt
Chogori= blouse

Fabric Choices
Modern hanboks are currently made out of a light woven fabric that holds it shape well but is still very flexible. I'm not quite sure what kind of fabric it is and I've only seen it on hanboks and I haven't seen it in the Los Angeles Fashion Distric either. The designs for this fabric are usually printed on in different colors but I've seen it a lot in gold. The designs are also very set, there is a specific pattern that they follow and very rarely are prints scattered.

Silk is still a traditional choice, very thick, strong silk. The designs are also printed on but there are also embroidered designs. However, silk does not BREATH, you will get HOT. I remember there was a post about striped sleeves, those are not only for dancers, I had a hanbok when I was little that had striped sleeves. A lot of people do, but currently, those striped sleeves are usually favored for little girl hanboks.


Chogori
There is NO INTERFACING on the ribbons at all, there's no feeling of stiffness, but they are two fabrics sewn together (there also is a special way you have to tie the ribbon.) There is however, a stiff white collar around the chogori that is about 1/2" wide that I would say is a bit of interfacing or even stabilizer, it's very strong. Also, the chogori must be crossed in a certain way, I'm thinking it's right over left but I'm having a memory lapse at the moment. The proper length for a chogori is to fall right beneath the breasts but modern times have changed that rule, as well as specific types of hanbok. The most modern style I've seen is just a regular jacket that closes with frog clasps that end right at the waist.

There are also specific places where there are seams which is under the sleeves and at the sides, there are no shoulder seams or seams attaching the sleeves to the chogori. Also, there is no visible hem on the chogori, it's completely lined with its own fabric.

Chima
The chima hasn't changed a whole lot. Traditionally, the chima is a wrap around skirt that wraps around beneath a woman's breasts and tied together although that's not always the case. It's typical for there to be a slit but it's usually held closed by the woman herself, and the skirt is gigantic anyway so nothing will be seen. There is a very narrow waist band that's smaller than the chima, the ties are attachted to the waist band itself.

There are also no visible seams on a chima nor a hem.

Underclothing
Yes, there is an empire waisted slip to give more fullness into the chima. Underneath that are pantaloons, simple drawstring short, slightly pants that end around the knee. There is also a very short shirt underneath like the chogori with sleeves, the one my mother has snaps closed.

Hair and Accessories
For women, there are two specific choices for your hair:

Braid: slicked back hair, singular braid, usually tied with a red ribon as wide as the ribbon on your chogori. There's a specific way to tie it to. This shows that you are unmarried.

Braided bun with a hairstick: slicked back hair, singular braid but rolled up into a bun, held in place with a hairstick. This shows that you are married.

Various things can be tied to the breast bows, around New Years' a little bag is tied there so that you can put your New Year's money in them =D There are also various ornaments tied there as well, very pretty ones at that like little beaded slippers, etc.

Final Notes
Seung Mina's hanbok IS NOT ACCURATE to the way hanboks are actually supposed to be. I haven't seen the patterns that are being offered for a female hanbok but what I've written down here are what I know about hanboks after wearing them so many times. My mother has loads of hanboks and my family is very traditional that we celebrate Korean holidays with the bowing to the ancestors, etc. I hope this has been helpful!

Last edited by BlueJeans07 : 08-08-2005 at 03:42 AM. Reason: typos >.<
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Unread 08-08-2005, 10:17 PM   #74
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Wow. Lots of info. ^^

Just added notes:
re: chogori
.: I used to have striped sleeve hanbok too! I would say it is almost definitely a little-girl thing. Or at least younger teen. Most older wear has at most 2 base colors. (Red and green seem to be the most popular)
.: They sell just the stiff white collars sometimes. My grandma has a bundle (20 or so) in her closet. Apparently, you're supposed to change them every other month or so because they wear out. (Of course, that no longer applies since we don't wear them on day-to-day basis.)
.: Actually, my grandma was telling me that chogori length varied in history. It's all a matter of what's in fashion at the time and what's not. It lengthens and shortens and lengthens again. She calls fashion a cycle because of that. ^^ (Historical dramas, while not entirely historically accurate, have wonderful hanbok costumes to look at. We were watching one when I asked about the chogori length.)

re: chima
.: I was actually told to tie above the breasts and then move them up to create lift. I was always too lazy to, though. ^^;; Tieing under seems to be much easier. *nods* Wonder why I didn't think of that... ^^;;;;

re: hair
.: Don't forget that you have to make a middle-part then slick to the side & back. ^^

OK... here's my hanbok mini-tutorial. ^^ I mismatched my hanbok because I didn't want to fold my white chima after I was done so I just took my red chima which was on a hanger. (Chogori=summer, Chima=winter) It looked easier to fold back. I am so lazy. ^^;;

1. This is my sokbaji. Like BlueJeans07 said, they are like pantaloons. Not historically accurate, but modernly adjusted. They have a big pocket in the front and have elastic waistband.
2. Then you wear the sokchima. Mine closes with a couple of hooks and large, flat eyes.
3. Then you should wear the chima. My grandma always threaded the right tie through the left armhole for more security? It might be just what my family does though. ^^;; You tie the chima in the front. Then you should tuck the bow under the tie so it is flat.
4. Next, you wear the under-chogori. *doesn't know proper name >.<;; * Winter (heavier cloth) hanbok don't really need this. (At least, I've never worn it with winter hanbok.) It's mainly for the summer (lighter, see-through) hanbok. Mine closes with a little velcro.
5. Then you put your chogori on. The only thing I notice now is that I tied the ribbon wrong. It's supposed to go the other way. >.<;; The bow part is supposed to go in the direction of the top part which appears to be wearer's left (viewer's right).

Feel free to elaborate or correct. It's been a while... ^^;;

Last edited by Raenef : 08-08-2005 at 10:20 PM.
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Unread 08-09-2005, 11:27 PM   #75
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Wow!! A hanbok has sooo many steps.. ahahaha.. so much harder then puttinh on a fancy dress or suit/tux.. boo my boring culture!! ahahaha

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raenef
Wow. Lots of info. ^^

Just added notes:
re: chogori
.: I used to have striped sleeve hanbok too! I would say it is almost definitely a little-girl thing. Or at least younger teen. Most older wear has at most 2 base colors. (Red and green seem to be the most popular)
.: They sell just the stiff white collars sometimes. My grandma has a bundle (20 or so) in her closet. Apparently, you're supposed to change them every other month or so because they wear out. (Of course, that no longer applies since we don't wear them on day-to-day basis.)
.: Actually, my grandma was telling me that chogori length varied in history. It's all a matter of what's in fashion at the time and what's not. It lengthens and shortens and lengthens again. She calls fashion a cycle because of that. ^^ (Historical dramas, while not entirely historically accurate, have wonderful hanbok costumes to look at. We were watching one when I asked about the chogori length.)

re: chima
.: I was actually told to tie above the breasts and then move them up to create lift. I was always too lazy to, though. ^^;; Tieing under seems to be much easier. *nods* Wonder why I didn't think of that... ^^;;;;

re: hair
.: Don't forget that you have to make a middle-part then slick to the side & back. ^^

OK... here's my hanbok mini-tutorial. ^^ I mismatched my hanbok because I didn't want to fold my white chima after I was done so I just took my red chima which was on a hanger. (Chogori=summer, Chima=winter) It looked easier to fold back. I am so lazy. ^^;;

1. This is my sokbaji. Like BlueJeans07 said, they are like pantaloons. Not historically accurate, but modernly adjusted. They have a big pocket in the front and have elastic waistband.
2. Then you wear the sokchima. Mine closes with a couple of hooks and large, flat eyes.
3. Then you should wear the chima. My grandma always threaded the right tie through the left armhole for more security? It might be just what my family does though. ^^;; You tie the chima in the front. Then you should tuck the bow under the tie so it is flat.
4. Next, you wear the under-chogori. *doesn't know proper name >.<;; * Winter (heavier cloth) hanbok don't really need this. (At least, I've never worn it with winter hanbok.) It's mainly for the summer (lighter, see-through) hanbok. Mine closes with a little velcro.
5. Then you put your chogori on. The only thing I notice now is that I tied the ribbon wrong. It's supposed to go the other way. >.<;; The bow part is supposed to go in the direction of the top part which appears to be wearer's left (viewer's right).

Feel free to elaborate or correct. It's been a while... ^^;;
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