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Unread 05-28-2006, 10:29 PM   #1
Necrobug
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latex prosthetics

Hi, I hope this counts as make up- my friends and I are cosplaying death note for Otakon this year and I am going as Ryuk.

I was wondering if anyone has ever worked with latex as far as making masks or prosthetics and could show me a trick or two?
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Unread 05-29-2006, 12:57 PM   #2
galaxiahime
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I've had limited experience with latex, but for attachment, you want Spirit Gum. And make sure you have make-up to blend the edges of the mask in with your skin.

This should be really cool, I'd love to see a pic!
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Unread 05-29-2006, 01:21 PM   #3
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Yeah, it'd be nice to see a Deathnote Ryuk cosplay for once. But instead of making a latex mask from scratch, you could probably find a generic zombie mask and adapt it. Of course, making it from scratch would probably be cheaper, but more things can go wrong with that. From what I remember, Ryuk's face didn't have too much detail, so it doesn't necessarily have to be a custom job.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 01:32 PM   #4
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I need to save this somewhere...Anyways here's what I posted on a previous call for help...copy and paste and edit a little...

Well, if you want it to fit you exactly first you take a cast of your face.

-things needed for this: bald cap, vaseline, warm water, caster stuff, "cat box", sand, plaster, measuring cup, plastic things, a friend
-The caster stuff was like what they use to make casts in hospitals. It came in rolls. It was like really loose woven threads with plaster gunk on it. Sorry I don't know exact details, school supplies and all that.
Directions for face cast.
-Clean face.
-Rip plaster stuff into little strips.
-Put strips in container filled with lukewarm water.
-Put on bald cap to protect hair.
-Slather, face, jaw, forehead, anywhere your going to put the plaster in vaseline.
-Have friend cover face in plaster strips. Go different directions, horizontal, vertical, diagonal.
-Use tiny strips to get around nose so you don't have to do the straws in the nose things.
-Cover face well. Don't have any gaps or skin showing through in areas.
-Sit and wait. Don't move. Don't let friend say funny things that will make you laugh.
-After about 20 minutes take off. You can kind of wiggle you face to get out of it.
-Fill in any gaps, like around the nose, with more strips so that you have a solid cast.
-Let set.
-Fill cat box with sand.
-Nest face cast into sand. If you need to block off some areas, like if they aren't too deep and you think plaster might spill out, set a piece of cardboard againts it.
-Cover inside of face cast, and possibly cardboard, with vaseline.
-Mix plaster in a plastic container with a plastic spoon.
-This is the type of plaster than comes in a large bucket and is just powder.
-Generall it's a two to one ratio of plaster to water.
-Sift the plaster into the water, don't dump it all in at once.
-Another way to measure is to sift your plaster into the water until the water stops absorbing it.
-Stir plaster.
-Pour into face cast.
-Leave it alone for a long time to let it set.
-Free your new postive cast from the negative one.
-Wipe it off, if there's any holes you can mix up a little plaster to fill them in.
-Now you have a face cast, yay!

-New materials, clay(the type that'll just about never dry), foil, latex.
-Get a big piece of foil and cover your new face in it. This makes it so that you can actually get the clay off later, and so that everything won't become a big mess of plaster.
-I like to start at the nose and gradually squish the foil down. You don't want any holes or tears in this.
-Sculpt what you want your prosthetic to look like on your face with the clay.
-Build a clay wall around the prosthetic. Give a little space between the prosthetic sculpture and the wall.
-Cover everything within the wall in vaseline.
-Mix enough plaster to fill the inside of the wall.
-Pour plaster in.
-Once again let it set for a long time.
-Remove clay wall.
-Take off new negative cast of prosthetic.
-Clean the inside of the cast out. That is wipe it down with paper towels.

-For the thick latex:
-For thin latex you have to be more complicated and use cheesecloth, I try to avoid that whole ordeal.
-Pour latex in, not quite so much as to completely fill up the mold.
-Swish it around so that the whole prosthetic-to-be area gets covered.
-Keep swishing for a few minutes.
-Pour plaster out into a tupperware container that has a cover.
-Let dry a bit, it'll kinda change color when it does this.
-(If you have a hair dryer with a cool setting you can use it to help dry the latex quicker.)
-Repeat the swishing process.
-Let is sit for a minute to let puddles form in the deeper parts.
-Pour out puddles into tupperware and cover.
-Once again leave it alone for a long time to sit.
-When you come back pull out your new prosthetic!
-Use scissors to cut away extra bits.

-Application:
-Clean, tone, and moisturize face.
-Glue down edges to face. You might want to use eyelash glue instead of spirit gum.
-We used a product called Wrinkle Stipple around the edges. It helps to blend it in a little better. It's got a brush in it's cap like nail polish.(And it smells really bad!)
-Then we covered the whole thing in Castor Sealer.
-Next just put your makeup on. Generally you have to put on a lot of base just to make your skin and the prosthetic the same tone.

That's about it. We did this in class so whenever I said long time that was generally inbetween classes or overnight. I wish the pictures from ours were up, but our instructor hasn't put them online yet. Mine looked a little more obvious around the edges than I would have liked. But I imagine there's products out there to help with this too. Plus class time is just never long enough for me to do everything I want. And I'm sure since yours will be covered in bruisey makeup that'll help to disguise it too. I made a cat face prosthetic for Red XIII btw. Oh ya, and if you don't need and exact cast of your face try it on one of those styrofoam wig heads.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 01:55 PM   #5
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Just thought that I'd mention...plaster strips don't pick up as much fine detail as some other types of casting material, in case you want it to fit your face exactly.
*found that out by looking up the stuff a couple days ago* T-T
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Unread 05-29-2006, 02:59 PM   #6
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Awesome ideas. Thanks for the help!

I'll be sure to post photos in the cosplay rating or whatever section as it comes along.

well generally as far as detail goes, I was concerned about getting that fugly bat nose right. I am thinking now about not making a whole mask so much as just parts of the face like the nose, cheek bones, forehead and chin (classic T-zone).
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Last edited by Necrobug : 05-29-2006 at 03:32 PM.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 03:00 PM   #7
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Is there another technique of making latex masks, which are only partially covering the face? I want to still be able to move my mouth, make facial expressions, etc.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 03:06 PM   #8
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well here is a site I was looking at that offers crash course texts and visuals in creating partial masks and stuff-

www.costumesandprops.com

you can also find a lot of places with just a google search X)
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Unread 05-29-2006, 03:16 PM   #9
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I'm probably butchering the spelling, but algenate...that's for picking up more details. It's what dentists use to take dental impressions. With just a layer of it though you'd probably still need plaster to back it up so it could be sturdy enough to pour plaster into.

And you just sculpt whatever part your planning on making when you make your positive of the mold. Most people in my class just made noses. None of us made a full mask. I was probably the closest and I did brows, nose, cheeks, and upper lip.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 03:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy Flower
Is there another technique of making latex masks, which are only partially covering the face? I want to still be able to move my mouth, make facial expressions, etc.
The technique is the same, build a face double, sculpt the mask you want, create a negative of that mask, and cast in latex. You'll just need to be sure to feather the edges of the latex so that it can blend into your skin, instead of having a visible latex edge.
But if your mask is going to extend below your cheekbone (i.e. the part of your face that moves), you might want to try foam latex instead. More expensive, yes, but it moves with your face. Liquid latex stretches in weird ways, or doesn't stretch at all if it's too thick. In that case, it usually tugs your skin in odd directions or just separates from your skin.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 03:46 PM   #11
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The foam latex is what I want to try next, do you know a good place to get it astillar?
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Unread 05-29-2006, 04:20 PM   #12
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If you've got a good theatrical store in your town, you might find it locally. Other than that, you'll probably have to buy it online. It's roughly $30/qt. Of course it gets cheaper the more you buy, but a quart is more than enough for a casual cosplayer.
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Unread 05-29-2006, 06:57 PM   #13
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Hah, good theatrical store in town, that's funny. *smirk* Sorry can you feel my bitterness...I work in my university's theatre's costume shop and we have to order everything. But we use just about only Ben Nye products so those are the only things I've really had access to so far. I guess I'll search around online or get friends who live in real cities to do some searching for me next time I feel like playing with prosthetics.

(BTW astillar, I dig your Sechs costume. Alita's on my to-do list for whenever I figure out a good way to do her arms since I want to do the early version and be able to look cool without a trench coat on.)
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Unread 06-03-2006, 07:28 PM   #14
Mai Kirasaki
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Well this is not about a mask but I figured I would ask since you guys are talking about latex and stuff.

I am doing a cosplay of Ayumi Hamasaki and I have never worked with anything other than regular everyday makeup. Does anyone know if latex could be used to create the implants on her arms and neck shown in the pictures I attached to this post?

Thanks
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Unread 06-03-2006, 08:04 PM   #15
astillar
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Yeah, you could make little latex prosthetics for those studs. Or you could just find some random little buttons/bolts and spirit gum those onto your skin, then feather them with some of that scar wax. I think the second option would be slightly easier and cheaper, but both should work well.
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