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Unread 07-18-2006, 10:23 AM   #1
hide110
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Question Help...about canon lens

I decide to buy canon 350D this week, but still not sure the body or kit..
which lens is good for take normal cosplay fotos.
does it 18-55mm lens enough?
thanX~
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Unread 07-18-2006, 10:41 AM   #2
Cikgu101
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I'm a Nikon user but I'll treat this as a DSLR Question

The 18-55mm is a standard Kit lens that comes with a DSLR as the most basic setup.

IMHO, it will be adequate enough to take any photos you want ... even Cosplay ones. Just practice more and don't be afraid to try anything new.

Perhaps a little tutorial on people and prortrait photography would help. lots of books and web references about them

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Unread 07-18-2006, 10:51 AM   #3
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The kit lens is a pretty good buy. If you're moving up to SLR, it's pretty much the smartest buy you can make. It's light, small, and easy to use. It covers wide angle at 28 mm (remember the crop factor) and even some telephoto at 85mm. It won't get you anything out of the ordinary, but it's great especially if you don't want to lug around other lenses. It's not a great lens, but it does the job well enough as far as image quality goes. I'd start out with it and then learn to appriciate better lenses as you can afford them.

Of course, if you think you know what you're doing and have the cash to spend, there's an EF-S upgrade lens which has better optics and some other better features, including a wider zoom range (up to about 85 instead of just 55) and I think USM focusing. There's also a nice Canon L-series lens for about a grand (more than the camera body is worth) which covers 24-105mm, all at f/4, and has USM and IS. But you should probably just save your money for now until you really know if and why you'd need a better lens.

However, as good companions to the kit lens, you should be able to afford the f/1.8 50mm prime lens (about $100) and a telephoto zoom lens in the 200mm range. Those lenses will cover most shooting conditions you're likely to encounter and won't cost you all too much. But as mentioned, start off with the kit lens and work your way up as you need more accessories. You'll appriciate them more that way.
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Unread 07-18-2006, 01:12 PM   #4
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Ollies covered this about enough.

I would add, however, the ef-s pgrade lens' giant difference at 17-85 is the fact its an IS lens. A hefty price difference as well.

I say go with the kit lens. For the price addition from the standalone body, its a good deal to have that lens in your bag until you find something you like better.

And lets face it... f/3.5 at W is fine. Its a fine lens to step into with a start in dSLR.

Lens snobs will say otherwise, but you're talking about people that have raised their standards much higher than they have to in cosplay photography.

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Unread 07-18-2006, 01:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ollie
The kit lens is a pretty good buy. If you're moving up to SLR, it's pretty much the smartest buy you can make. It's light, small, and easy to use. It covers wide angle at 28 mm (remember the crop factor) and even some telephoto at 85mm. It won't get you anything out of the ordinary, but it's great especially if you don't want to lug around other lenses. It's not a great lens, but it does the job well enough as far as image quality goes. I'd start out with it and then learn to appriciate better lenses as you can afford them.
I would agree, get the kit lens. It may not feel like that well built of a lens (plastic mount and basic build) but it does have pretty good optics comparatively.


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Of course, if you think you know what you're doing and have the cash to spend, there's an EF-S upgrade lens which has better optics and some other better features, including a wider zoom range (up to about 85 instead of just 55) and I think USM focusing. There's also a nice Canon L-series lens for about a grand (more than the camera body is worth) which covers 24-105mm, all at f/4, and has USM and IS. But you should probably just save your money for now until you really know if and why you'd need a better lens.
Yeah, save money there are even better basic things you can get instead of a lens. I don't remember what the rebel comes with for memory but if it does come with any IT WON'T BE ENOUGH FOR AT A CONVENTION! I have a 1Gig and a 256Meg card and am getting a hard drive dump for them. 80 Gigs for the cost of three 2Gig cards (shooting raw uses lots of memory). Another VERY helpful item is an external flash. This helps to add A LOT more light than the built in one and helps prevent red eye. Lastly a second battery can be convienient, don't want to run out of battery and not be able to take anymore pictures in the middle of the masquerade or something like that.

The lens that Ollie is reffering to is the EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS. A very nice lens for an aditional ~$600 over the cost of the body.


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However, as good companions to the kit lens, you should be able to afford the f/1.8 50mm prime lens (about $100) and a telephoto zoom lens in the 200mm range. Those lenses will cover most shooting conditions you're likely to encounter and won't cost you all too much. But as mentioned, start off with the kit lens and work your way up as you need more accessories. You'll appriciate them more that way.
I would say pretty much the same.
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Unread 07-18-2006, 03:20 PM   #6
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Seriously, read this:

http://photonotes.org/articles/beginner-faq/lenses.html


it looks like a long read but it will tell you everything you need to know about lenses. which ones are good for which purpose, and describes nearly every canon lens in detail. A lens is a big purchase.. so you dont want to go in uninformed, and you dont just want to take someone's word on it. I think its important to know what you need and WHY. this article will help you tons
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Unread 07-19-2006, 05:12 PM   #7
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THANKS FOR ALL YOUR GUYS~~lalallalala~hugsss~
I go kit first then see which lens should I need~\\\n___n///~~~
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Unread 07-19-2006, 10:09 PM   #8
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I use mostly the 50mm 1.4 Ultrasonic prime lens at cons myself on my 35mm SLR. It's a great focal length that has minimum distortion as well as very fast optics. The only downside is... you got to zoom with your feet. I use a wide 28mm 2.8 prime for those group/dynamic space pictures. Primes are great because they're cheap, perform very well, and most of them have metal mounts.(the 50mm 1.8 MKII has a plastic mount).

However, seeing that you have a DSLR, you're probably better off with wider lenses. I really don't see a need for anything longer than the 50mm equivalent at a con unless you plan on doing head shots or spy shots. Zooms are probably the most cost efficient way to go, but you limit yourself to mostly flash photography indoors because of the slower optics. I don't know how the EF-S lenses work, but most film lenses work best when set somewhere between two stops above and below maximum and minimum aperature.
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Unread 07-20-2006, 08:06 AM   #9
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There's a few cases where a 100+ mm lens can be useful. I use an 80mm - 200mm lens (on a 350d, so it's more like a 130 - 300mm) sometimes. Indoors it's not too useful, but outdoors where I can get some space it gives a good bokeh effect. It's also good for large groups, since if you try to get a large group from up close with a wide angle lens you can get some distortion effects. At ANext a big Kingdom Hearts group assembled on the steps to the convention center. With a telephoto, I could go across the street and shoot the group almost perpendicularly, meaning the people in the front didn't dwarf or block people in the back. Similarly, a good telephoto with a large group means that even if you have to stay 20 feet back to avoid blocking other photographers you can still get shots of individuals. And if the stage is well lit enough, you can use it for the masquerade, too. Handheld indoors, though, unless you have a top-notch lens (f/2.8 or better), anything past 125mm will probably cause blurring due to slow shutter speeds. I couldn't have gotten some of my best shots without a good zoom lens, so I think they have their place. In general, though, they're not too necessary. A good prime lens will probably be a lot mor useful; I use my 50mm a lot more than the telephoto zoom lens.
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Unread 07-20-2006, 06:03 PM   #10
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A nice, flexible lens that I use is the 28-200 4.5-5.6 by Canon. Although it can be a little slow at the long end, the 200mm focal length allows you to get fairly tight for close ups. Unfortunately, no image stabilization for this puppy.

It's fairly large and heavy, but has a nice focal range. Not the sharpest lens out there, but it can take the place of two fixed focal lenses, a wide and a tele. When shooting AX2006 with my 24-105, I felt that I missed some close ups because I didn't have the extra reach (and I didn't want to move closer and step into someone else's shots). For convention shooting, like AX2006, the 28-200 fits the bill nicely.

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Unread 07-27-2006, 02:09 AM   #11
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I tend to like faster zoom lenses, I've usually found that they are better in the low light of a convention hall.

I'd suggest a lens in the 17-120mm range can't remember if canon has a lens like that, but it is usually a pretty good basic range to have.

My first really useful lenses werw a tamron 28-135 and a nikon 50mm. but it was a great starting point. for my current collection.
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